NRNP 6655 DQ Mood and Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents

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NRNP 6655 DQ Mood and Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents

NRNP 6655 DQ Mood and Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents

School and going out with my friends used to be fun, but not anymore. Mom keeps telling me just to go
out and have fun, but I don’t see the point of trying. All my friends are better than I am. I keep having
these headaches and just feel worthless. I used to get As and Bs in school, but not anymore. I can’t
concentrate at school. I would rather be at home sleeping.
—Madison, age 16
Mood and anxiety disorders can be particularly challenging to address in childhood and adolescence for
many reasons. Children may not be able to fully express or understand their feelings and behaviors.
Parents may misattribute or not recognize signs and symptoms. The symptoms of disorders also vary
when present in children as opposed to adults. The PMHNP needs to know how to diagnose these
conditions and must understand the importance of integrating medication management strategies with
both individual and family therapy to optimize treatment outcomes.
Learning Objectives
Students will:
 Explain signs and symptoms of mood and anxiety disorders in children and adolescents
 Explain the pathophysiology of mood and anxiety disorders in children and adolescents
 Explain diagnosis and treatment methods for mood and anxiety disorders in children and
adolescents
 Develop patient education materials for mood and anxiety disorders in children and adolescents

Learning Resources

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Required Readings (click to expand/reduce)

Hilt, R. J., & Nussbaum, A. M. (2016). DSM-5 pocket guide for child and adolescent mental health.
American Psychiatric Association Publishing.
 Chapter 3, “Common Clinical Concerns”
 Chapter 7, “A Brief Version of DSM-5"
 Chapter 8, “A stepwise approach to Differential Diagnosis”
 Chapter 10, “Selected DSM-5 Assessment Measures”
 Chapter 11, “Rating Scales and Alternative Diagnostic Systems”

Shoemaker, S. J., Wolf, M. S., & Brach, C. (2014). The patient education materials assessment tool
(PEMAT) and user’s guide. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.
https://www.ahrq.gov/sites/default/files/publications/files/pemat_guide.pdf

Thapar, A., Pine, D. S., Leckman, J. F., Scott, S., Snowling, M. J., & Taylor, E. A. (2015). Rutter’s child and
adolescent psychiatry (6th ed.). Wiley Blackwell.
 Chapter 60, “Anxiety Disorders”
 Chapter 61, “Obsessive Compulsive Disorder”
 Chapter 62, “Bipolar Disorder in Childhood”
 Chapter 63, “Depressive Disorders in Childhood and Adolescence”

Required Media (click to expand/reduce)

Center for Rural Health. (2020, May 18). Disruptive mood dysregulation disorder & childhood bipolar
disorder [Video]. YouTube. https://youtu.be/tSfYXkst1vM

Mood Disorders Association of BC. (2014, November 20). Children in depression [Video]. YouTube.

Psych Hub Education. (2020, January 7). LGBTQ youth: Learning to listen. [Video]. YouTube.

Medication Review
Review the FDA-approved use of the following medicines related to treating mood and anxiety disorders
in children and adolescents.
Bipolar depression Bipolar disorder

lurasidone (age 10–17) aripiprazole (age 10–17)

olanzapine-fluoxetine combination
(age 10–17)

asenapine  (for mania or mixed episodes, age 10–17)
lithium (for mania, age 12–17)
olanzapine (age 13–17)
quetiapine (age 10–17)
risperidone (age 10–17)

Generalized anxiety disorder Depression

duloxetine (age 7–17) escitalopram (age 12–17)
fluoxetine (age 8–17)

Obsessive-compulsive disorder

clomipramine (age 10–17)
fluoxetine (age 7–17)
fluvoxamine (age 8–17)
sertraline (age 6–17)

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